The 6th CERIC Doctoral Conference 2017: ‘The Employment Relationship’

Ceric 2017 Blog Picture

CERIC Doctoral Students: Marina Boulos, Juliet Kele, Meenaskshi Sarkar and Frederike Scholz.

‘Work’ is a central activity for people for economic reasons as well as a person’s social and psychological well-being. Since work is formalised in an ‘employment relationship’, it is essential to question and comprehend all aspects of this core component of people’s lives. Today the ‘employment relationship’ as understood traditionally appears to be changing at an unprecedented rate. New organisational forms, employment contracts, the rise of the self-employed and the gig economy make it imperative for us to question the traditional paradigms through which we understand the labour market and people’s experiences within it.

Building upon its past successes, the Centre for Employment Relations, Innovation and Change (CERIC) conference organising committee at Leeds University Business School are pleased to announce the theme for the 6th Doctoral Conference: ‘The Employment Relationship’. As in previous years, the CERIC Doctoral Conference offers an inclusive environment for doctoral students at any stage of their PhD to share their research and knowledge with peers, but also academics within CERIC. It offers a great opportunity for doctoral students within the Work and Employment Relations field, but also other areas of social science research, to receive constructive and valuable feedback, and to network with academics that are interested in many aspects of the ‘employment relationship’.

CERIC is pleased to offer a prize for the best presentation, which will be the costs (up to £400) to cover attendance at a leading conference of the student’s choice. There is also a prize of £100 for the best poster presentation.

This year’s conference organising committee consists of four doctoral researchers who focus on different aspects of the ‘employment relationship’.

Workplace Stress: Is Prevention Better Than Cure?

Within her PhD research, Marina Boulos explores what is actually done about stress in the workplace. Who is responsible? How is stress managed? Can it be prevented? With the research project, she is trying to answer these questions via two case studies by interviewing main actors in stress management, as well as their employees. Her study tries to discover who’s considered to be responsible for managing stress, designing, implementing and evaluating stress management interventions in organisations.

Career advancement in small and medium enterprises (SMEs): experiences of a diverse workforce

Juliet Kele is investigating how career progression is structured within small and medium-sized law firms in the Yorkshire region; the factors affecting such progression; and how and whether diversity within the smaller firm workforce is managed. The impetus for this research is that despite the economic importance of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), they remain insufficiently studied regarding diversity issues. Juliet uses intersectionality theory in order to examine gendered practices in the SME context.

British Pakistani taxi drivers: An insight on class, culture and employment habitus.

Meenakshi Sarkar has adopted an ethnographic study nestled within the structure and agency debate. While most academics agree that there exists an ethnic penalty in the British labour market, Pakistanis seem to be paying an additional Muslim penalty and a Pakistani penalty, which pushes them to the bottom of the pile in comparison to other ethnic minorities.  Almost 1 in 4 Pakistani men in the UK drive taxis for a living. Is it a choice or a result of constraints? Meenakshi argues that the intersectionality of class, affiliations, gender, and ethnicity form a habitus (Bourdieu, 1984) which metaphorically forms a mental ‘cage’ which impacts on their their agency. The choice to drive taxis is steeped in years of neglect, discrimination, marginalisation and constraints – both real and perceived – in the labour market.

Disability inequality and the recruitment process: responding to legal and technological developments

Frederike Scholz has adopted an emancipatory research approach that has investigated the experience of disabled jobseekers and the growing use of online recruitment and selection practices within the UK. Online recruitment and selection practices can be viewed as inequality regimes that are built on the principle of ‘ableness’, which discount individuals who are not seen as ‘ideal’ because of impairment. In order to understand all aspects of the employment relationship, Frederike has also investigated organisations’ knowledge about the discriminatory impact of online recruitment tools.

The deadline for abstract submission of up to 300 words is Friday, 14th April, 2017

(Notification of acceptance will be sent by Tuesday 18th April).

The abstract submission can be made via email – cericphd@leeds.ac.uk

To register please go to: http://business.leeds.ac.uk/about-us/article/2017-centre-for-employment-relations-innovation-and-change-ceric-doctoral-conference/

Marina, Juliet, Meenakshi, Frederike and the CERIC team look forward to welcoming you on Wednesday 10th May.

For further information, please contact The CERIC team at cericphd@leeds.ac.uk

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